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Welcome to one of the most popular city break destinations in Europe, which hosts about 8 million tourists annually. Prague is the capital of the Czech Republic and a significant cultural and economic epicenter of Central Europe.

It is a city of beautiful architecture, medieval castles, and awesome museums. You can see the historical Fort Vyšehrad, the wonderful Strahov Monastery, and even the buildings built by the Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV.

You can also get a guided tour of Prague in English to visit the most significant sights and learn more about the architecture and the city’s history.

Some of them are the National Museum with art and natural history exhibits, Old Town Bridge Tower, and the Dancing House, a building of unusual design and architectural style.

To see something unique and artistic, you can tour the most bizarre sculptures around the city, made by famous Czech sculptor David Cerny.

Prague's Old Town
Prague’s Old Town

Did you know that Czechs are known for drinking the most beer in the world?

Some of the most popular beer brands are made here, such as Staropramen, Krušovice, and Pilsner Urquell. In honor of beer, Prague is the home to the Beer Museum, where you can taste different beers and learn more about their production. You can visit it in the middle of the Stare Mesto (Prague’s Old Town).

The Czech capital is also an ideal spot for day trips to the smaller historical towns. Consider visiting Cesky Krumlov, a lovely fairytale town with cobblestone streets and significant historical heritage.

Two other great options for a day trip from Prague are the picturesque town Kutna Hora, and the Pilgrimage Church of St John of Nepomuk in Zelena Hora.

Here is a List of the Top 10 Things to do When You Visit Prague

Charles Bridge, Prague. Photo by Martin Krchnacek
Charles Bridge, Prague. Photo by Martin Krchnacek

1. Stroll the Charles Bridge

Charles Bridge is the most famous structure in Prague. It is a medieval stone arch bridge over the river Vltava, built in the 14th century.

The Charles Bridge is 516 meters long and 10 meters wide. It has 16 arches, three bridge towers, and 30 baroque statues of saints. Thanks to its historical significance, the Charles Bridge was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Also known as Stone Bridge or Prague Bridge, that gothic bridge today connects the Old Town and Lesser Town. It is a pedestrian zone with many souvenir vendors and street musicians, and the top place in every Prague travel guide.





2. Explore the Grandiose Prague Castle

Prague Castle was founded in the 9th century, and it is the largest coherent castle complex in the world, according to the Guinness Book of World Records.

Declared as UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Prague Castle is a symbol of the Czech state, with churches, gardens, and historical buildings and palaces in Romanesque and Gothic styles. Although the whole complex is vast, strolling through the famous Golden Lane street, with many small houses will be worth it.

In the past, the Prague Castle was used as a seat for kings of Bohemia, Roman emperors, and presidents of Czechoslovakia. Today, the official office of the President of the Czech Republic is in Prague Castle.

Inside the whole complex, you can attend the Changing of the Guard ceremony, see the beautiful Old Royal Palace, or visit St. Vitus Cathedral, the largest church in Prague. With nearly 2 million visitors per year, the castle is the most popular tourist attraction in Prague.

📍Tip

Discover all of Prague Castle during this Prague Castle Walking Tour including admission tickets. Learn about the history of this spectacular building complex, listen to stories about kings, princes, and emperors and the ceremonial history at St. Vitus Cathedral from your local guide, visit Golden Lane and others!

St. Vitus Cathedral, Prague. Photo by Timo Volz
St. Vitus Cathedral, Prague. Photo by Timo Volz

3. Visit the St. Vitus Cathedral

St Vitus Cathedral is the largest cathedral in the Czech Republic and the seat of the Archbishop of Prague. It is situated within the Prague Castle complex. Throughout history, the cathedral was used for the coronations of Czech kings and queens.

The construction of the St Vitus cathedral began in the 14th century and was completed in the 20th century. The main tower is 102 meters high and it is one of the most famous landmarks in Prague.

St Vitus Cathedral is also home to Crown Chamber with crown jewels, and beautifully decorated St Wenceslas Chapel, with the tomb of St. Wenceslas. In the interior of the St. Vitus cathedral, you can see stained glass windows, eight heavily gilded statues of Czech patron saints, and the silver sarcophagus of St. John of Nepomuk.

4. Explore the Historical Old Town Square

Old Town Square (Staroměstské náměstí) is situated between Wenceslas Square in the Nove Mesto (New Town) and Charles Bridge. It is a historic square in the old town district of Prague, founded in the 12th century.

There you can find the Gothic Church of Our Lady before Tyn, the baroque St. Nicholas Church, the former royal residence Stone Bell House, and the Kinsky Palace, with the art museum of the Czech National Gallery. 

There is also the Old Town Hall building with a medieval astronomical clock. Next to the Old Town Hall, you can find the House at the Minute, in which the famous writer Franz Kafka lived. In the northeastern part of the square, there is the Jan Hus Memorial monument, dedicated to the famous religious reformer from the 15th century. 

Interestingly, every December, at the Old Town Square you can visit one of the best Christmas Markets in the world.

Prague Historical Tours

Boat on the Water at Sunset, Prague. Photo by Rodrigo Ardilha
Boat on the Water at Sunset, Prague. Photo by Rodrigo Ardilha

5. Discover the Historic Jewish Neighborhood

Jewish quarter, also known as Josefov, is located between the river Vltava and the Old Town Square. The Jews lived in Prague since the 10th century. However, in the 14th and 20th centuries, Jews endured difficult periods due to pogrom and holocaust.

However, the 16th century was a period of growth during which many buildings were built. These buildings later survived even the destruction during World War II. 

Today, there are six synagogues in the city. You can visit the Pinkas Synagogue, which is transformed into a memorial center, the Klausen Synagogue, which is the largest in Prague, and the Spanish synagogue, which is known for its wonderful adornment. Gothic-styled Old-New Synagogue from the 13th century is the oldest active synagogue in Europe.

You can also find several city landmarks there where you can learn more about the unsettled history of the Prague Jews.

Some of them are the Jewish Town Hall, Ceremonial Hall, and the Old Jewish Cemetery. We recommend visiting some of the many kosher restaurants in the Jewish quarter, to try out the traditional dishes.

Wallenstein Palace is a beautiful baroque palace situated in Lesser Town (Mala Strana quarter). It was built in the 17th century for Bohemian military leader and nobleman Albrecht von Wallenstein. Today it is used as the seat of the Senate of the Czech Republic.

Palace is worldwide known for its beautiful gardens. From April to October, the Palace Garden is open to the public. You can enjoy a walking tour in a peaceful ambiance and admire beautifully decorated lawns, floral alleys, and fountains.

During the summer months, you can attend cultural events and the exhibitions at the Wallenstein Riding School, which is adapted into a gallery.

Evening in Prague. Photo by Frantisek Zelinka
Evening in Prague. Photo by Frantisek Zelinka

7. Enjoy the Best Views of Prague

Petrin Hill is one of the most popular parks and picnic areas in the Czech capital. It is located on the left bank of the Vltava river. The main sight here is the Petrin lookout tower, inspired by the famous Eiffel tower. If you are brave to conquer 299 steps to the top of the tower, you can enjoy an amazing panoramic view of the city.

For the best experience of Petrin Hill, we recommend visiting the Mirror Maze and the Petrin observatory. There are also many charming pubs with beer gardens and the best Czech beers, so you can check out why is the Czech Republic one of the best places in Europe for beer lovers.

If you don’t want to stroll, you can take the funicular from Mala Strana district to the top of Petrin Hill.

8. View Prague from the Vltava River

The best way to experience Prague is to book a Vltava cruise tour and enjoy sightseeing from the water. There are many tour providers with different routes and types of the cruise. You can take a sunset cruise, a one-hour river cruise, or a cruise with dinner and live music.

During the cruise, you can learn more about Prague’s history from the guides, and see the most famous landmarks, such as the Charles Bridge, the National Theatre, and the Prague Castle.

The cruise companies operate all year round, not just in the summer. So, you can take a cruise in the winter as well, because the decks of boats are fully heated.

Charles IV Statue in Prague. Photo by Anastasiya Dalenka
Charles IV Statue in Prague. Photo by Anastasiya Dalenka

9. Explore the National Technical Museum

Near the Letna Park in Prague, you can find the National Technical Museum, which preserves items related to the history of technology.

There are exhibits dedicated to transportation development from the 19th century to the modern era. You can see some of the most interesting old Mercedes Benz models of cars, as well as Supermarine Spitfire and other famous planes.

The museum also hosts astronomy, architecture, and mining exhibitions. You can also see the equipment that was used in TV and photography studios. If you are going to Prague with your family, kids will be fascinated with a playroom, which is equipped with popular Merkur toys and construction sets.

With lots of positive messages and inspiring lyrics and murals, John Lennon’s Wall is a symbol of peace and love. You can find it in Praha 1, Prague’s central district.

After the assassination of musician John Lennon in 1980, one artist painted a mural dedicated to the famous Beatles star. In years to come, many locals wrote graffiti against the communist regime. The authorities removed all the messages from the wall several times, but the new graffiti was written again and again.

Today, the John Lennon wall is one of the main tourist attractions in Prague, and it is under protection as a significant cultural site that symbolizes free speech and peace.

Book This Trip

Ready to plan your culture-rich adventure to Prague? Start preparing with knowledge on how to get around, hotel and VRBO accommodations, local restaurant reviews and more through TripAdvisor and Travelocity.

Plan even more fun with unique Prague activities and expert-led tours through WithLocals. Explore the city like a local and learn insider knowledge about Prague. Find more information and book your dates here.

For the best flight deals, train tickets and car rental options, check out OMIO Travel Partner.

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Author Bio: Based in Serbia in Europe, Marija Stojanovic Petkovski worked as a journalist but realized writing about the most beautiful places in the world is something that inspires her. She is sure that a pint of good craft beer perfectly accompanies a tasty home-made lasagne. In her spare time, she enjoys playing with her children and spending time outdoors with her family. 

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One Comment

  1. I loved Prague. Before I came there I didn’t know what to expect. I’ve been to many beautiful European cities, and I thought that Prague won’t impress me. But boy I was wrong. I spent some 5 days in Prague, and it was not enough for me to explore the beauty of the city.