Aboard the Green Turtle: Boston’s Floating B&B

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USS Constitution in dry-dock. Photo by Frank Hosek
USS Constitution in dry-dock. Photo by Frank Hosek

According to Seaman Rodriquez, one of several naval personnel on-hand to oversee the refit, the ship enters dry dock about every 20 years for below-the-waterline repairs. The renovation is scheduled to be completed in July of 2017.

From there, we strolled through the neighborhoods of Charlestown, made up of its colonial, red-brick, row-house style housing, on our way to Monument Square, home to the Bunker Hill Monument.

Rising 221 feet, the perpendicular finger of granite thrusts skyward marking the first major battle of the American Revolution, on July 17, 1775. A celebration of victory by defeat, the British held the field after the first pitched battle of the revolution, however they suffered staggering losses at the hands of the patriots.

An obelisk built entirely from quarried granite, it took over 17 years to complete. In a slightly dizzying and definitely lung-testing decision, we chose to climb the 294 circular steps to the top. The satisfying accomplishment provided a great 360-degree bird’s-eye-view of Charlestown and Boston.

That evening, a half mile walk over the Charles Bridge took us into the heart of Boston’s North End. “Boston’s Little Italy,” as it is sometimes called, is teeming with many Italian restaurants and shops. For dinner, we wondered into a classical Italian restaurant, Massimino’s Cucina Italiana.

It’s an acclaimed family run restaurant whose red-bricked facade, basement dining and close quarters provide for an intimate experience. After being schooled in the fact that ordering Minestrone simply meant that she had ordered “soup” in Italian, Kathy chose the Tortellini. I ordered the lobster ravioli, whose rich tomato sauce would make an old shoe a delicacy.

After dinner, we were compelled to stop in one of the neighborhood’s bakeries, Maria’s Pastry Shop, for a bit of Old World Italian dessert. With some assistance from the bakery’s house cat who insisted on following us through-out the shop, we settled on a slice of Boston cream pie (of course) and a concoction known as the Lobster Tail, a flaky pastry shell filled with a vanilla mousse cream that’s beyond big enough to share.

The sunrise over the marina. Photo by Frank Hosek
The sunrise over the marina in Boston. Photo by Frank Hosek

The following day, we roamed the immensely walkable downtown Boston area. We let the famous red-bricked path of the Freedom Trail be our guide as we wandered into the rich history of one of the oldest cities in America. The 2.5-mile trail passes by and through a dozen and a half locations that highlights events that occasioned the colonies separation from England, including Paul Revere’s house and the Old North Church.

At the end of the trail, embracing a warm, autumn evening, we stopped at a local bodega for a bottle of wine, a brick of cheddar and some fruit on the way back to our floating retreat. Leaving behind the noisy, teeming streets for the quiet intimacy of the marina, we made up our bohemian dinner and watched sea-going freighters make their way through the harbor as they journeyed into the Atlantic. With the waters of the bay sloshing gently against the hull, we slipped into a peaceful retreat that no hotel room could provide.

There’s something soothing about being on the water and being disconnected from everything. We had set sail for adventure and had never left the dock.

If You Travel to Boston:

From Logan International it is a 10-minute trip to the Green Turtle in a water-taxi.

The Green Turtle
http://www.greenturtlebb.com/

Boston CVB
https://www.bostonusa.com/

Food:
http://www.massiminosboston.com/

Italian cuisine at its best:
http://mariaspastry.com/

Author Bio: Frank Hosek is a sometime traveler who embraces the journey and the written word.