Celebrating the Lone Star State

The Alamo at night
The Alamo at night

When the good folks at Texas Tourism coined the phrase, “Texas, It’s a Like a Whole Other Country,” they were only half joking.

In fact, Texas really was its own country for almost a decade. After much political maneuvering, the Republic of Texas joined the United States in 1845 of its own free will — and with a few conditions. For one, Texas retained the right to leave the Union upon a two-thirds majority vote. The state also insisted on the right to fly its own flag at the same level as the Stars and Stripes.

Even today, the Lone Star State has a mind of its own. Texan children recite a pledge to the Texas flag right after pledging to the American one, and the state still retains that independent spirit.

Texas is huge, the size of Ohio, Indiana and the Middle Atlantic States combined. It encompasses a vast range of topography, from humid, subtropical coastal lowland to high mountains to desert plains. There are large, vibrant cities and tiny country towns. Texas seems to offer it all — and it’s an excellent destination for travelers.

This month, Go World Travel celebrates the Lone Star State with a special section on Texas. From there, we head to the “underground” side of Montréal and then across the vast plains of Australia by train. Ron Mitchell takes us on a delightful tour of Vietnam, and Jennifer Carlisle shares the all-too-vivid story of her “souvenir” from Peru.

Go World Travel covers destination around the globe, and we hope you enjoy this issue. If there is a destination you’d like to read about, please let us know. We always enjoy hearing from you.

Happy Travels!

Janna Graber, Managing Editor
Go World Travel


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